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SMART HEARING – ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES OF ACOUSTIC WELLBEING HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE

Wann
Freitag, 22. November 2019
– Samstag, 23. November 2019

Wo
Bischofsvilla, Otto-Adam-Str. 5

Veranstalter
DFG-Forschungsgruppe "Mediale Teilhabe", Prof. Dr. Beate Ochsner, Dr. Robert Stock und Prof. Dr. Michael Schillmeier (Exeter)

ReferentIn:
Stig Arlinger (Linköping), Rainer Linus Beck (Freiburg), Joeri Bruyninckx (Maastricht), Jörg Fachner (Cambridge), Mara Mills (New York), Sarah R. Payne (Edinburgh), Shintaro Miyazaki (Basel), Jan Rennies-Hochmuth (Oldenburg), Jens Schröter (Bonn), Miklas Schulz (Hannover, Essen), Jürgen Tchorz (Lübeck), Viktoria Tkaczyk (Berlin), Mike Wright (Wrexham)

Modern hearing practices are inseparably intertwined with our sensory, cognitive and affective capacities which are configured by social and cultural processes increasingly mediated by technological innovations. This interdisciplinary workshop explores the history, cultural practices and theories of senso-enabling technologies that have been profoundly affecting our hearing practices and health. To grasp the impact of these multi-faceted developments, the workshop takes into account the potentials, promises and risks of both smart hearing practices and acoustic technologies of wellbeing. It will ask how technologies were decisive in the ways ‘normal’ hearing, hearing impairment or acoustic stress have been configured. Furthermore, we aim to analyse technologies, which have been developed to foster smart hearing practices that aim at acoustic wellbeing e.g. for people who deaf or hard of hearing. Such practices and developments are currently being embedded in an increasingly hybrid ecology with hearing devices and interconnected systems creating novel auditory environments. Their effects remain to be investigated to deepen the understanding of the complex interrelations between hearing enabling technologies and health.